Friday, March 16, 2012

Sheeple Are People Too

Barbara: I was not going to write about this. I don’t know; maybe I didn’t want to rant at you again, maybe I hoped something funny would happen to me over these last few days and I could tell you about it and we could all laugh and laugh. But as often happens with my most tenacious thoughts, they really dig in their claws until I let them have a few moments in the spotlight. As my threshold for pain has lowered dramatically in my middle years, I’m gonna go ahead and do my little rant. Also, nothing funny happened to me. So please feel free to disagree with me here (ironically, I have a high threshold for debate).

Remember when I posted that Kony 2012 video the other day? And I’m sure you all know how it just exploded since then, both in viral hits and in discussion, rhetoric, and vitriol. The thing is, I did do a bit of homework before I posted—and I knew there was some controversy about the facts, history, and worthiness of the charitable organization behind the video (Invisible Children). If you read our comments section, you might’ve read the part where Brianna and I discussed some points and issues. The reason I went ahead and posted the story to the blog was because I was so excited that a “cause” had ignited the hearts and minds of millions of people—and at that time, mostly young people. This was for me a sign that it was possible to have care and concern generate a contagious momentum. The fact that the video hits have now topped a 100 million people absolutely astounds me—that’s right up there with such deep and world-changing Youtube fare as “Charlie bit my finger” and Justin Bieber’s “Baby”.

And, maybe because I’m a glutton for punishment, and maybe because I really really do love debate and turning issues over and looking at them from other sides than my own, I ended up mostly reading articles about this phenomenon (is that the right word?) that basically lambasted this effort and vilified anybody who made or supported the video. And I could totally understand their points: yes, we should do our homework before blindly committing to something, and yes, there might have been mistakes on the part of the filmmakers, and certainly there might be hundreds of important issues not addressed in the film. But I did—in my own homework—trust that these young people really wanted to make a difference. And I didn’t wholly trust all the facts of the naysayers either.

What I really didn’t get, what I struggle now to understand, what confuses and annoys me is the anger and insults hurled toward people who are trying to make a difference (even a possibly misguided one). In one article I read, they actually called the video supporters “sheeple”. Cute play on words, I’ll grant them that, but so very insulting. And I started to worry—maybe needlessly—that all these millions of people who decided to take up a cause and stand up for something fundamentally wrong ... would now feel like idiots. I know that I certainly vacillated between righteous anger and self-conscious embarrassment. Within minutes of posting the Kony link to her Facebook, a beloved was castigated by foaming critics of the film until she felt compelled to take it off her page. Because I had already decided to trust the good intentions of the filmmakers (for right or wrong) I worried that they would now feel like dolts who should crawl into a hole and lick their wounds, instead of feeling proud that, after spending 9 years in and out of the jungle, getting to know the story and its victims, aligning with those victims, dreaming of and then following through on their plans to help them, they managed to document a film (which is either a good or bad one) and tell it to the world. I highly highly doubt they had visions of personal wealth dancing in their heads. I can’t imagine they dreamed in their wildest dreams that “viral” would mean anything more than a few million hits, if that.

Is this what we want to do? Is this how we want to feel? Please, yes, let’s debate and discuss how to take care of the good of our planet—we’re bound to disagree!—but please, let’s support our often maligned and underworked sense of compassion. Do we want to be those people in our homes who hear the woman screaming outside but don’t call the police because we’re afraid of being judged stupid, deemed wrong, or making a mistake? Not me, baby, not me.

It’s not our fault or the filmmakers’ fault that this happens to be the medium that brought awareness to such a huge amount of people. If only it had been for a less controversial issue; if only it had been made in a less controversial way. But it wasn’t. This is the piece that broke through on a scale which journalists and humanitarians the world over, sadly, could not achieve. And the beauty is, if we do learn to raise our voices, even in misguided ways, we get used to raising our voices. Then we get used to doing a bit more and a bit more. Today it might be clicking on a video, tomorrow it might be doing more and better research, the day after it might be going to our governments. And if there are issues around the issues that need to be brought to light, the conversation can—and will—shift and change accordingly. But we’re talking, people, we’re talking! We are not sheeple. We are all in this together.

Maybe that old axiom “the road to hell is paved with good intentions” should be “good intentions paved the road away from hell”.

PS I talked to Deb and Charlotte about this before I posted and it led to some lively discussion. Charlotte emailed me this link (after I’d written my piece, just fyi!) and it seems fitting to add it here. This is by Nicholas D. Kristof and it appeared in the op-ed section of the online New York Times; he actually addresses several of the negative articles that I read and shares a similar dismay over the denouncement of the filmmakers: The bottom line is: A young man devotes nine years of his life to fight murder, rape and mutilation, he produces a video that goes viral and galvanizes mostly young Americans to show concern for needy villagers abroad — and he’s vilified?”

Also, it seems fitting to end on a high and related note: yesterday the judges of the International Criminal Court released a unanimous decision to convict Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, a Congolese warlord, for turning thousands of children into soldiers.

Deb: Barb has already very nicely represented my point of view so I will not take too much time in my comment. I feel very much as she does: “but they are doing SOMETHING!” And I agree that I do not think that the motivation behind the film was a get-rich-quick scheme. If that were the case they could have picked a much easier, safer, more comfortable subject. Growing up in the 60’s and seeing protests and being a part of them (smaller ones) it is great to see people rally behind an unjust cause. People can certainly decide what to do with their hard-earned dollars regards charity, but it is tough to look away when the truth is being raised. Awareness is worth gold. 

62 comments:

  1. I do agree with you on that it is important to raise awareness and that this video was the best way to do it. The video itself wasn't my cup of tea, and after watching it I did get a feeling that someone might want to get rich with this. I can't say where the feeling came from, it was just something about the video. None the less I did share the video to my friends, as I thought that the message is that important. I do not consider myself a sheeple and do find it funny how some just attack on the cause. Where has the conversation gone? Making mistakes is allowed, and I think some have forgotten this. (Yay for Failure Day, may it come this year too.)

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    1. Oh, thanks for the "failure day" note!! Yes. As for the "getting rich", if your instinct is right and there was any of that in mind, I bet they will feel very accountable now with 100 million people watching ;)

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  2. Oh...Barb....I felt so much resonance in this....I loved the way you addressed this topic sweetie....!!! And Deb..you spoke the PERFECT WORDS.....“but they are doing SOMETHING!” One sentence. And it said EVERYTHING!
    Its true....This happens with everything...no matter how good anyone does....someone finds a way to insult it because "THEY THINK" its wrong....I mean if they dont like it big deal..its their opinion...but just because they dont believe it doesnt mean ITS WRONG....there is not right or wrong its all perceptual !! I guess we talked about it before....But thats the thing....Whatever we do someone finds a way to ruin it..but its in our hands whether to LET THEM or not ! Point is it will not stop 'PEOPLE' like us....because in spite of this we stand with what we believe and trust me...like minded people join in and it becomes bigger ad bigger that is another reason I absolutely adore the Kony video....the guy spent 9 years..doing what he did....he created the video and I am pretty sure....he didnt MAKE people do this....he UPLIFTED them....the video spoke for itself...and that matters...
    I honestly know how the "sheeple" thing feels....felt bad a lotta times when it happened many different ways to many things I believed in...Yet now I believe....that the power is within us...and no matter what anyone says.....IF WE BELIEVE WE CAN CREATE !!! and this definitely is a time of AWAKENING....because people are beginning to become AWARE of their power...And I promise you...It WILL make a difference for our future!!

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    1. You know I believe in your absolute positive spirit, Shalaka, which is probably one of the reasons I feel so compelled to spread the "positive" energy as well and try to deflate the "negative". Thanks for the beam of light!

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    2. I Try !!! And I am so proud of you.....you were full OF light my Darling !! I just showed it to you :)

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  3. I really agree with you on this one. I've been surprised by how many responses to this have carried such a strong undertone of we're right, they're wrong and you better agree with us or you're an idiot that bothers me. It certainly isn't a very productive take on things anyways.

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    1. I've noticed recently that most political discourse has become quite extremist in that respect - "I'm right and you're not. Those who follow you are stupid, so let's throw rocks at them. And, your father was an Elderberry and your other was a hamster..." (Granted, I wish we could have discourse like that last bit...) Is it just me? Has it gone beyond just political discourse? Is this a North American phenomena? What is gained by engaging in such a manner? Am I just putting on my Tiger Lily Glasses and being naive? I just don't get it.

      And yes, I'm having a RCAF (Royal Canadian Air Farce) moment of their "Confused Philosopher"...

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    2. It does seem to be a running theme in a lot of different things. It's disheartning to see how humanity seems to be moving even further from the idea of rational debate and heading towards an ideal of right and wrong based on personal opinion. Just as an example in politcs the recent Vic Toews gaffe of "If you're not with us you're with the child pornographers" I mean really that gave me a bit of a WTF moment.

      We aren't going to solve anything by ignoring it including the wars in Africa. This video no matter how controversial the group itself is brought attention to something that should be a topic of discussion. From that aspect I must say good for them. Could it have been done with more accountability for charitable donations in mind, with less expense yes probably but that doesn't mean we should simply discount the messsgae itself.

      "Knowledge can create problems, it is not through ignorance that we can solve them" - Isaac Asimov

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    3. Both great thoughtful responses, ladies. Jo, I laughed out loud for the Elderberry/hamster line! Yeah, that's what we need to be talking about, right??? And from the ridiculous to the sublime, Erin, that Asimov quote if very fitting. Thanks to both of you for wading in.

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  4. This is awesome Barb, and thank you for speaking up and speaking your mind!

    I think the conversation and debates around Kony 2012 are great, it gets people talking and gets people learning. I do however have a massive problem when people pull any old thing out of the air to condemn Invisible Children. I was absolutely outraged the other day when I read an article stating that Kony 2012 was "just another incidence of white people trying to save black people". Invisible Children and Kony 2012 has to do with a lot of things....but should have nothing to do with race. This is just an example of some of the outrageous ideas that are being used to slander this movement.

    Invisible Children are indeed doing something. I have also noticed that the people condemning the campaign are often people or organizations who probably only wish they could mobilize half as well as Invisible Children has.

    The Kony 2012 video is a first step, and like you said Barb hopefully the next steps are education, awareness and activism.

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    1. Exactly. And it's thanks to committed, courageous people like you that I believe it's possible that we can get there.

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  5. I am on both sides of this issue and have been posting both sides. I follow Charity Navigator for my contributions and they didn't rate this organization high enough for me to contribute. But awareness is another issue and that they have done.
    As I age I become a bit of an isolationist> I think the hubris that Americans show towards thinking their ways are the best ways make me crazy sometimes and I have come to realize we can't save the world as much as I would like to. I have seen the US decline in prominence and our educational system (which I believe is our future) become so marginalized. I would love to see everyone in the US have a roof over their head, food on their table, healthcare for all and a truly amazing educational system. I understand wars are going on everywhere and we need to help but in what ways. Making a video and raising money to make it for almost 10 years wasted a lot of time exposing someone when on the ground behavior might have been doing much more. I know Uganda has gotten lots of aid and I also know countries need to solve their own issues without our total immersion in their country. It reminds me of the quote teach a kid to fish rather than giving him the fish (you know the quote). I also know that if anything like this happened here most countries would not line up to help us. I am a liberal, Jewish woman, 63 years old who is getting tired of fighting the good fight. In the 60's I fought for women's rights to see them totally be eroded now in the US by the far right and there are very few marches. The young women take for granted what I fought for and I want to see women stand up. I feel it is building momentum. I am all over the place with charities and something in my gut wasn't willing to spend any money on IC. The video is great and it has raised awareness and I would hope if they make money they will put more on the ground and less into producing another video. I want my money to go to 90% on the ground and 10% for overhead and staff. IC doesn't meet that criteria so as they say on that Shark show. I am out.

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    1. I so relate to the questions you have here about getting those who live in our own supposed "first world countries" the care and attention they need. Especially when it comes to fundamental things like food, education and healthcare. To me, this is where we have to let go of our fears and worries and greed and trust that if we take care of our brothers and sisters, we will all be better off.

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    2. Thanks for fighting the good fight as long as you have. I've so mush respect for the women who really did fight for womens rights in the 60's. I know it's made my life better.

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    3. I agree with you Madge that we want to save the whole world, but in reality we can't do it. I do think that we should try, even in the smallest ways possible, to make what differences we can.
      And, as a future educator, I just want to say that the education systems are improving. They did dip a bit, but laws are changing and requirements for educators are getting more difficult, which means better educators in our schools. It takes voices like yours, mine, and others to get these things done for the children that need us to stand up for them when they can't stand up for themselves.

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  6. Barbara, I hope you are right and all will be better off. Thanks Erin. We fought so hard and to see it being wiped out by the right makes me sad and very tearful.

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  7. I've kept quiet about this subject because I disagree about what is actually being accomplished with this film. It's educating the younger generation about what goes on in other parts of the world. However, I'd truly prefer it if the younger generation of OUR country would learn about the problems of OUR country first. We can't take care of our own, and our anger is directed elsewhere.

    I'm not arguing the point. It's just the point I wish were being made instead.

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    1. Oh, absolutely! Look up at Madge's heartfelt response -- she says the same thing. This is so true. Maybe someone will have the courage to take this subject on -- because otherwise we risk finding ourselves in similar dark and awful circumstances.

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    2. I was trying to take a clue from Madge's input. I do agree with a lot of what she said. In particular, we agree about the financial/donation aspects of it, as well.

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    3. I agree, there are a lot of problems at home that need to be addressed and people here that need our help.

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  8. HUGE HUGE P.S.

    Last night was my first Colin and Brad show of the year! AWESOME night. They're still really funny. :D

    Last night was also some proof to myself that I have, in fact, made progress psychologically and emotionally. I wasn't a basket case as I talked with Colin. I felt EVEN. SUCH a good feeling. Was TRULY fantastic.

    Deb, I love your husband.

    Barb, I love Deb's husband. {{{HUGS}}} to all of you. xxoo

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    1. "Deb, I love your husband.
      Barb, I love Deb's husband."

      I totally laughed out loud on that one!

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    2. EEEK!!! They're so awesome!! Deb, please make them come back to Kentucky if at all possible! I've told my mom that if they do she's coming down and doesn't have a choice!!!

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  9. I must admit that I haven't read much about Kony (and the discussion) after watching the video.

    I did read an article that was in our newspaper, but it just showed some facts.

    But after I posted the link on my twitter, one friend started posting articles and statements, why this idea is all wrong (that's why I asked in your previous post...). She really made me feel like an idiot, and I became insecure.

    I haven't talked to her, because I was too afraid...I know...I know.

    But I hate it, when people think that their opinion is the right one and don't care if someone else has a different opinion.

    I know that every nation has its own problems, and that there is a lot more to do. But you can't help everybody at once. And it's important to start doing something somewhere. Small steps, right?

    It's not that others aren't that important...but you can't put all your energy in different projects. You have to focus on one.

    And it's better than complaining and do nothing.

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    1. Small steps, but steps, yes. This is what I believe (and what I hope will help us move away from apathy more and more until we get really good at it!)

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  10. Last update (for now):

    My daughter is now officially a member of the National Honor Society and National Technical Honor Society. Mama is proud!

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    1. Thanks! And I'm glad I made you laugh. :D

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    2. That's AMAZING, Dawn!! Congrats! xoxo

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  11. You make a really good point here. When I watched the video I was worried that it might be offensive to the people of Uganda, a fear that was backed up when I came across feedback from them and other Africans later on. Despite thinking that, however, I'd like to think that the video really was well-intentioned and it really has succeeded in raising awareness about a horrific issue. And I have nothing but respect for those who reposted it. I think that the flaws of the video were unintentional in an "I just didn't think about that" kind of way; and let's be honest, I've done that way more times than I'd like to admit to. So that leaves my response to being glad that people are trying (and risking themselves) to help out other people. Good on them!
    Ok so I side-tracked a little, but I really do agree that people shouldn't be insulted for looking at something in a different way than the critics did. I have to say, this issue has grated on me for a little while too. If I can expand it for a moment, I'm sick of people so readily attacking others for not knowing something that is considered general knowledge - ignorance of one thing does not make you stupid, it just means you've never come across it before. Religious beliefs as well: I've heard both atheists and christians say, "I can't believe intelligent people believe all that." It's been really bugging me. Believing one or the other does not make you stupid! I've been taught and read about science from both a atheistic and a religious viewpoint and trust me, it's a lot about education rather than intelligence! Both sides are heavily biased and I've never come across an objective scientific resource. Essentially my point is the same as yours, I wish people would stop being demeaning to those of different opinion.

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    1. Aimee, I really love how you've articulated this. It completely resonates with me. The idea that just because you don't know "everything" doesn't make yous stupid or wrong (and sometimes the "smart side" gets misrepresented and makes mistakes as well).

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  12. Hi Barb,
    This is all about intention and less about the form. what I mean is, every single choice of the 100 million was driven by an intention, and it appears the intentions were fueled by something positive and caring. That mass intention, to care, is what is the success to be celebrated. How great that so many people acted and co-created with caring intentions. Oh well, others poo poked it and did not get the bigger picture. what matters now is how we each choose to give it meaning. I choose to see how amazing people are when there hearts are activated and they care, regardless of the details.
    People are good!

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    1. (that's weird -- I published a reply to this and it's disappeared, so I shall try again...) First off, Val, I'm sooo excited to see you here (and PS I love your site). Secondly, you expressed my thoughts exactly -- and, like so many people here, even better than I could! And I also wanted to add that Deb often uses this mantra to remind me and others that intent is often the most generous and best way to measure people's actions.

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  13. Discussion on any level is positive. What is discouraging is the trend to criticize each other so viciously from the safety of our own homes. I love the computer as much as the next guy but we seem to be losing the ability to converse civilly. Whether or not their intention was to make money they shone a spotlight on a dark corner of this world for others to see. I love your blog and the topics you discuss. Cheers Ladies!

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    1. Thanks, John, for the vote of confidence! And I so agree that our ability to converse (or inability) so often turns these kinds of issues into battles between "right" and "wrong" instead of real and fluid debates.

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    2. John,
      I think it's a lot like when I was in Customer Support. Some people I would talk to on the phone were awful and rude until I met them in person. I then became a living, breathing, human to them, not just an inanimate object, i.e. the telephone. People get online and make a lot of stupid and rude comments because they aren't, in their minds, conversing with a human being. Sure, some people are just nasty and rude regardless, like Rush Limbleck for example, but I prefer to think that people would behave better if they realized there's a human on the other side of their computer screen.

      Barbara,
      I'm immensely pleased that people are using the internet for good. Just look at what's happened throughout the world recently in regards to world communication. Dictators have been overthrown with the help of Twitter! I think the nay-sayers are frightened that we the supposed "sheeple" are getting together. There's strength in numbers and we are realizing our strength. There's no END to the good we can do as long as we don't let the ones who would profit from our backing down silence us. Power to the people, baby!!! I'm excited. :)
      I used to have debates with my mom about how wonderful the internet was. She never really understood that it's a window to the world. You can find out ANYTHING just by looking in that window..so to speak. :)
      Sure there's erroneous information out there, but if you look in more than one place for information you'll find you can weigh the data and get a really good understanding of what's fact and what's fiction.
      We're coming into a new age now. We're awake, aware, and getting more involved. It's about damn time!
      ....and....breathe. ;)

      You go right on ahead and post things like this whenever you want. It's your blog and you rant if you want to.

      HUGS & HUZZAH'S,
      Karen

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    3. I love you, Karen, and I thank you for this. I feel more emotional than righteous today because of what's happened to the young man behind it. But the way you've specifically phrased your response here just hits me right in the good place. It's easy to "throw in the towel" when it gets tough and when people make you feel stupid and hopeless, but this whole experience shows just how important it is for us to keep using the internet to spread good and positive messages, like you say here, because there will be no dearth of naysayers, bullies and powermongers who would like to believe we don't have it in us to change the world like this.

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  14. I haven't watched the video, but I have been keeping abrush with the situation. It seems unfair that because of ONE man's actions, the charity of Invisible Children is now getting spat in the face.

    Some students at my school did a fundraiser my freshman year for the organization. That was the first time I heard about it. I really have nothing concrete to contribute; mostly because I don't know what is really going on. All I know is that it's just not right :/

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    1. That's okay, Kelly, you don't need to know what's going on specifically because this whole conversation has always been in its essence about supporting each other and not vilifying each other because "my cause is better than your cause" or "my way to spread a message is better than your way" etc etc. So I thank you for being here and part of the discussion.

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  15. The only thing I can think to say is basically reiterating what many have already said. At least it is out there now, being discussed. At least it is out there for people to disagree on rather than being covered over without any thought one way or the other. I don't know what to think in some ways. What is going on in Uganda is clearly horrible, no question on that one, but how to help and who to trust to help is the big question.
    The first step is acknowledging the existence of a problem. The answer(s) will follow...in time.
    At least the conversation has started.

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    1. Exactly, Kelly, this is one of my points, along with the one that we're talking about positive change, so thanks for being here and being positive!

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  16. Just checking my stuff before heading to bed -- and of course can't miss all the coverage that one of the founders publicly lost it and has been taken to psyche. In my need to write about this story one more time today, I never imagined that the possibility of a young man "licking his wounds" would actually turn into something far worse. So sad. So sorry. That's it. No other words.

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  17. How many times in our lives do we say to ourselves "I'm only one person how can I make a difference?" Then we are presented with a rare opportunity to do just that. Anyone with a heart would respond in the hopes that they can be of some help to someone, anyone. I don't see where there is or should be any shame in that. It is part of our being human and having empathy for our fellow human beings. Whether legitimate or not, in the end our intentions were good and heartfelt and I don't think any of us should feel any guilt about that. Absolutely we should be well informed before we invest in anything but I think we should always trust our hearts.

    I posted it to my Facebook page as well and I immediately got both negative and positive comments. As far as I'm concerned I did what I set out to do, I got the word out and made people want to look into it. Whether it's right or wrong is something they can work out for themselves just as I did.

    Good night ladies and sweet dreams to my new friends!

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    1. Good night Mary... Good night John Boy.... ;) teehee

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    2. Thanks for the smiles, ladies. Sadly, because I read the news about the breakdown right before I went to bed, my sleep wasn't so sweet. But you guys are giving me lots to feel good about this morning vis a vis the big picture -- and being reminded again just how many people want to focus on the positive sides of an issue and not all the bad stuff.

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    3. Barbara,
      I'm not surprised at his breakdown. How could any human go through all that he has and NOT be damaged? It's just not possible. Let's all think positive thoughts for him to get better. PTSD is insidious and very difficult to recover from. I know firsthand, unfortunately.
      So if you go out and have green beer today make a toast and wish for his recovery.
      Biiiiiiiiiiig HUG,
      Karen

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    4. Best possible sentiment today. I have and I will, thanks Karen! Big hugs to you xoxo

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  18. first of all barbara this blog belongs to you and deb , you both should be able to post what you like. if people disagree with what you are saying they should keep the expression of their opinion within the bounds of civil discourse . there is no way you or anyone else should be attacked for posting the kony 2012 film . America has the right of free speech in the constitution ( no European country i know of has the same provisions , Ireland certainly doesn't) but with free speech comes responsibility .

    i am glad you posted that film . it helped me to educate myself on the situation in Uganda . when i watched the film i went to yahoo and looked around for information on the situation in that country . yes i would have a couple of questions for invisible children but they are right about the LRA. it also is worth looking up Uganda on the amnesty international site . http://www.amnesty.org/en

    the problem is people believe they are anonymous on the net once they hide behind an i.d they think they can say anything in what ever way they like . as Karen Frazier said , they don't see a human being behind the words . maybe it is time we all thought before we typed .

    i am very sorry to hear about the guy behind the kony 2012 film having a mental breakdown . i hope he recovers soon .

    finally happy St Patrick's day !

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    1. Happy St Paddy's Day to you, my darlin'! You must tell us how you're celebrating. Thanks for your message here and for all you meant within it. "The person behind the words" is the heart of all of this: there are individuals behind every word and action and so many are decent and compassionate.

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    2. i forgot to bid you la fheile padraig shona dhaoibh in the Irish language , thats happy St Patrick's day by the way ! it's pronounced law a-la four-ig hona deeubh

      well to be honest as my family is Anglo Irish we don;t usually celebrate St Patrick's day. with an english Dad and boyfriend i don;t think i would make a republican! by the way in this case republican does not mean american conservative political party but an Irish nationalist !

      we normally relax in the house . Monday is a public holiday . we would normally go out for a meal to the best restaurant in my suburb but i don't think that will happen this year .

      there are parades in most cities and towns here but to see the Dublin one you would be better off at the TV. the city is usually more then a bit crowded today . my own opinion would be the parade in Dublin is more for people who come to visit then it is for the locals . i think you will find a lot of the locals in the pubs especially as Monday is a no work day for some!

      we also have the St Patrick's weekend festival round the city . they have a huge fun fair on merrion square near the centre of the city . getting into the city is normally crazy today as a lot of bus routes are diverted due to the parade .

      for my family this year celebrating St Patrick's is complicated by the fact i have a raging time of the month and mom is a sick as a dog from the effects of a visit to hospital yesterday for 8 am to check on her porto cath and from her chemo the day before .

      apologies for going off topic (again!)

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    3. i forgot to add this .i hope it might make you smile .

      a toast to St Patrick:

      St Patrick was a scholar who through strategy and stealth
      drove all the snakes from Ireland
      have a toasting to his health .
      but not to many toastings least we loose ourselves and then
      forget the good St Patrick and see the snakes again

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    4. I wish you could see Karen's emailed cartoon for St Patrick driving all the snakes from Ireland. Made my day!

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  19. Barb, I feel ya on the not-so-sweet sleep thing.

    Here is a quick copy-paste of my facebook status this morning:

    When I see the video of Jason Russell, arms flexed, fists closed, legs spread but strong on California cement, I don’t see evil or fraudulence, I see a man who wanted to change the world alone, in accordance to his own, beautiful vision. Intelligent enough to strategize his influence, but too hopeful and inexperienced to know that he was at the mercy of the brutal, brutal humanity of a desensitized world. Someone whose intellect is finally buckling to everything outside of himself. That is the worst way to buckle.

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    1. This is beautiful, thank you. Copied and pasted to mine now too.

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  20. May you have plenty to eat, plenty of friends
    And always a soft place to lay your head
    And may you live fifty years in heaven
    Before the devil knows you're dead

    Quote from Gregory Peck

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  21. Sharon(May the odds be EVER in your favour!)ReineMarch 17, 2012 at 5:18 PM

    Sheeple- Sheeple who need Sheeple
    Are the luckiest Sheeple in the World.
    We're lamb-dren needing other lamb-dren
    and yet letting a grown up pride
    Hide all the need inside
    acting more like lamb-dren then lamb-dren!!!
    (sorry it was too tempting but still not a baaaad sentiment!)

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    Replies
    1. Can't pull the wool over YOUR eyes, Sharon. ;)

      Karen

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    2. Love this! Needed it too. Thanks, Sharon.

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