Wednesday, November 28, 2012

BOOOO to BOOOOOOS


Deb: Recently Justin Bieber was the halftime act at the Grey Cup Game here in Toronto, and I was appalled to find out that he was booed. Booed throughout his performance and booed when he came on stage. WTF?

Some people will say that it was because he wore overalls the day before to accept a Queen’s Jubilee metal. First off, let me say that he explained himself saying that he was backstage doing a meet-and-greet and had to be presented the award in a small stadium room. Even the Prime Minister tweeted his support and made a joke about the fact that he had told the Biebs that he, too, would be wearing overalls.

Some people booed because, as they said, they simply don’t like him or his music. Really? Booed him for that, did you? Listen, I am not a fan of the Biebs in that I don’t have his music on my iPod, but I am not supposed to be a fan. His music isn’t for me. I am not his demographic. My version of the Biebs was the Monkees and David Cassidy. Every generation has theirs. But I do appreciate the fact that whether or not he is your cup of tea, he is a talented, very hardworking young man. I think he deserves respect for that. I am ashamed of the fact that a stadium full of people (not all of them, clearly) booed him. What are these people thinking? I hate the booing. Hate it. Hate it for anyone. Not a fan of our mayor. I would go so far as to say I do not like him or the job he has done in this city. Yet if I were introduced to him, I would shake his hand and say “How do you do?” And in a public forum I would never ever boo him!

I hate when the out-of-town team is booed anywhere in any sport. It is the vestiges of Roman Gladiator days that I wish had disappeared! I find it rude and childish, mean-spirited and offensive. In the last months, from the presidential debates to the Beibs appearance I have heard more boos than Halloween on steroids. I find it the basest part of our culture. Does anyone ever stop to consider the fact that these people are just trying to do what they have been elected to do or hired to do? They are bringing their skills to the table, like them or not. They are human beings, after all. Just picture yourself trying to make a point at a town meeting, or making a presentation at an office meeting—and people boo you. You make an appearance in the room, you simply step in, and you are met with boos. Think about that for a second. I think you will find that it hurts.

I don’t even care that I sound like an old fogey today. This is so rude. It makes me so sad that this young man stepped on to the stage in that halftime show and was jeered and booed. Add to that the fact that he was hired to do that job. Shameful.  Because no matter who he is, or who you think he is, I can guarantee you, he was hurt. Who wouldn’t be?

The individual who is being attacked is doing his or her best to bring their talents. As a member of the chorus of boos, you have nothing to offer but your cowardly mob mentality.

Not really a talent is it?

Barbara: Well, if being appalled by this makes you a fogey (which I do NOT think it does), then paint me fogey too. I didn’t watch the game (which is the Canadian equivalent of the Super Bowl), but heard a passing reference to the booing. I was so surprised that I thought the Biebs must have done some horrible thing—like a hit and run, or a nasty tweet. To find out he was booed for being himself is so shocking and, frankly, disappointing, I don’t even know what to say. Thankfully, Deb, you did a bang-up job of saying it all. This riles me especially since I’ve only heard lovely things about the boy—and he’s also still a boy, people! Sadly, he had to experience a hard life-lesson in how the “reptilian” brain gets the better of too many people. Like you, Deb, I have always always hated the booing. You know what I love, though? Unabashed cheering and clapping. 

48 comments:

  1. Here, here, well said Deb!! I think it is horrible ANY time people are booing someone. I really think it shows how "little" they are. Shameful!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree that the booing was cruel, althought I am by no means a fan of him. I understand why it it's wrong to boo someone for just being there, for showcasing thier talent(s). Here is the thing, though, for me: I will boo when it comes to someone who is being a jerk, who is ignoring the people, who presents themself as a gift to mankind. Mostly this refers to politicians and such. I boo when I think they are not taking me and the rest of the population into consideration. I boo to be heard in these cases. Mind you, I don't do it as a means of disrespect, I do it to stand up for what I believe in. The boo of a crowd can sometimes get a point across that we are not going to take it anymore.
    But, as you said, in the case of Beiber, it was not called for at all. He is still a kid and he did not deserve it. It's not like he crashed the party or anything or started telling everyone his political views...He was doing his job. No need for hate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right Steph, he did not deserve it in any way shape or form. If people don't like his music, that's fine. You don't have to voice it, right?

      Delete
  3. I boo for the same reasons that I cheer. When I boo it is for them to hear me like Steph explained above. When I cheer it is for the same reason to be heard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes I agree Madge and Steph that sometimes it is to be heard. I suppose there is a place for it although I would try and find an alternative as it is just not the way I roll. But I did boo. Only once. A stand up comedian was attacking another stand up and making fun of him for his native background. Out came the boos before I knew what hit me!

      Delete
  4. I really agree with you, Deb. To me it is just common decency to greet someone with a smile and kindness. It's good for everyone, when we do it. Of course I think we should be authentic, but when our first move is a positive one, the counter move will often be positive or at least neutral. Genuine kindness can subdue the rage and judgment that seems to inhabit so many today. I am choosing kindness and it starts in the home!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes Eileen that is the point I was trying to make. Indeed. Common decency!

      Delete
  5. Alirght I wrote a big comment and its all gone... Damn this universe works fast... you get angry....and it has to snowball everywhere!

    Anyway, ya know what paint me fogey too. I do agree I dont really like him. And I was surprised and said "really??? him??" when I heard that he has the most viewed videos on youtube. But I wouldnt ever say that to someone who love him or liked him even. Its just sooo sooo terrible that people would Booo him like that. I just dont get it. If they hate them sooo much why would they even GO to his concert. To boo him??? Really???? Is hating someone for the sake of hating...SOOO DAMN IMPORTANT??? Is it soo important to make someone feel terrible in front of thousands of people? Damn I'm happy I dont have many people like THAT in my life! So very grateful.

    I mean Ive had my share of boos..because I'm a Twilight fan... Yep Ive had boos because people love letting me know that my choice SUCKS. My good friends sometimes. I mean I know everyone has their opinion and all but why cant they keep it to themselves and shut the fuck up. I mean I really respect Biebs sometimes that he endure so much hate and still stands tall. And he is a boy... Just a boy. There was a time when someone throw an empty bottle at him when he was on stage. And He was took it so well he was like "Why would you do that...that didnt feel good" and he carried on very easily.... And I swear I felt bad for him. I was like "How can he be so calm???". And there are trolls all over fb who keep bashing him and some troll who always goes "....still a better story than twilight"...who asked you asshole??? I know I'm angry...(angrier in the comment that got wiped..happy that it did now) but I did make a new record of being angry on the blog! :D
    Ya know Louis CK says it right....there should be Lions...everywhere so that trolls like these think 10 times before doing something shitty!!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJmtVqQSWHk

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so right Shalaka! People just HAVE to tell you that they think you are wrong. They have to. Can't help it! There opinion is the only one that matters and if you don't agree-BOO! Not my style.

      Delete
  6. Well, our national paper also got on board with this one: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/commentary/editorials/shame-on-those-who-booed-justin-bieber-at-grey-cup-halftime/article5740955/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really Shame on them! I still cant get over the fact that...they booed an 18year old...and by extension all his fans most of who are in their teenage. And at this age they hear people telling all of them that they're opinion sucks and that these people who booed are better than them. Because that how we motivate teenagers nowadays..*scoffs*

      Delete
    2. Thanks for posting that Barb! I was so surprised and pleased when I saw that in the paper this morning.

      Delete
  7. Ditto! I too was more than appalled at the embarrassing behaviour by the game audience. That is sooo not good sportsmanship, sure doesn't present Canadians well at all at any level. Grown adults demonstrating such negative, unnecessary behaviour was disgusting. All present who participated in this immature act should be so ashamed of themselves and worse for teaching such a wrong message to younger teens/children who were watching in the audience and in their homes. Not OK. I don't care for the music either but I would never, ever boo a performer who is trying his/her best to give the entire, diverse audience an entertaining half time experience. However, good for Justin who was the one to set an example of how you can overcome adversity, negativity and display such grace under so much negative energy. Egg on those nay sayers faces and it looked good on them. I wanted to smack the shit out of those folks who were faceless cowards in the stands and the mob like mentality of their actions. Disgraceful. That young man deserves a severe apology. Big time. And where was his and event management knowing the crowd was not his demo and it was a big risk to put him out there at his expense. Not theirs that is for sure. I doubt they got the much coveted younger ratings throughout the game..half time maybe. Terrible all around.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Patricia. I am so glad to see that people are voicing their opinions so he knows that not everyone feels this way. I also feel it's fair to mention that many many people in the stadium did not boo and some were probably very pissed at those who did!

      Delete
  8. I had similar thoughts while at Universal Studios watching one of the shows. There was a group who was booing the cast before walking out part-way through the show. It was not a very good show to be honest but this was their job and I think they deserved recognition for doing the best they could with the materials they had. I can't imagine it's easy to perform a show you in all likelihood know isn't the greatest 4 times a day almost every day and still manage to appear enthused.

    Booing to me is something that should be reserved only for those who have actually earned it through abhorent actions and negative behaviour never just for doing their job. For example I wouldn't boo Justin Bieber even though I don't care for his music, someone like Chris Brown on the other hand I might boo because I believe his actions have earned that kind of disrespect.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Erin that story makes me cringe. I am so glad you shared it. Young people starting out just doing what they have been hired to do! Chris Brown is an example of someone who's behaviour I have sometimes wanted to boo! ;-)

      Delete
  9. I'm not a fan of Justin Bieber by any means, but that's still really rude. :/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is Kelly yes. We don't need to be fans to have respect do we?

      Delete
  10. I've never even heard one of Justin's songs but I agree that booing him was going too far. They were booing him because of who he is, he can't help that.

    Now for the flip side. I am an avid sports fan and I have booed before. Here is the thing thou, I boo because of the athlete's actions ....most of the time. Like in NASCAR for example. During driver introductions there is one driver who has shown his rude and mean side of his personality in the sport so he tends to get a lot of boos when he is announced. But ask any fan and we can't deny that he is a great driver. We are booing because of his actions and chioces not because of the things he can't change. (PS the driver knows he gets booed and has taken to the media to laugh about it, so I don't think the boos effect him at all, or at least he doesn't show it)
    I have also booed at baseball games. This is the part that isn't right I'm realizing.... I am a Mets fan and we happened to be down by 10 or 12 runs this particular game. So when they other team got two homeruns in one inning we Mets fans lets out a boo. We were meant to be sticking up for our team. we all knew the homeruns were impressive but looking at things from the other team's POV I can see how it may have been hurtful to hit a homerun and then be booed.

    In Justin's case he should not have been booed and the people who booed should feel bad for what they made him feel like, in my opinion (which may seem hypocritical...)

    I like this post. It's made me think about what I've done and I guarantee I will think good and long before booing someone again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Kelly! It's a tough one the sports version isn't it? Because it has been ingrained in us over time. I am telling you the truth when I say that after a sports game, I cannot look into the faces of the losers. So given that, I just can't see myself booing. But I do sort of "get" the sports boo. Sometimes it's in fun. Still wouldn't want to be on the receiving end of a boo though.

      Delete
  11. Agree with all these comments - it was just plain rude of those doing the booing. I say boo to them and their rudeness. It also makes football fans look not stellar. And while I am in the older group in terms of appreciating his type of music - wondered what the planners of this event were thinking scheduling him for this venue. Pretty sure there are not gazillions of young ladies watching football - and is it really likely that they would tune in cause he is there? Logic escapes me on this.

    Dorothy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know Dorothy I wondered the same thing. I guess they figured he is one of the biggest acts in the world and he is Canadian and it was the 100th anniversary. I guess they thought, as Canadians we would be polite. They were clearly wrong, sadly.

      Delete
  12. Wait, Canadians' boo'd? Surely they must have imported some Americans to do this dastardly deed?
    All kidding aside, having done the stage thing in my younger years, I always get a pit in my stomach if I hear people either being boo'd or worse silence. I don't think people realise how hard it is to just get up on any stage, no matter the size.
    Heidi

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Wait, Canadians' boo'd?" was my first thought when I heard about this! :)

      Delete
  13. Here's the thing...He's a lovely kid...Don't know him personally but he went to school in Stratford with a dear friend of mine's younger son. Unfailingly, he's reported to be a delight by the inhabitants of Stratford many of whom are major talents in their own right...

    Performed at a local school here in my neck of the woods after the school beat out other area schools by raising the largest amount for charity. Then 17 year old daughter, who is a fan,and her bestie set off to find him. They did. He was driving through our suburban streets and he was gracious enough to stop his limo to take pics with them. Because that would have to be fun for him seeing he probably does it thousands of times per year...Do you think it might speak to this young man's innate graciousness perhaps?

    Friend who is the mother of Justin's classmate was at the Grey Cup and seated behind a man who booed. She described him, and I think the description to be perfect and applicable to anyone who followed suit, as a "lout"! Sad thing about civility today...it seems more and more the louts will have their say. Are we really surprised that the inarticulate sound of of "BOOOOO" is the usually the best they can do. Honestly, use your words or better yet, if the act is not your cup of tea, hang on to the thought this too shall pass.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perfectly said Annette. I feel so maternal towards this kid over this. I know he's a big star with more money than I will ever see, but I think "wow, how would I feel if it were my child?"

      Delete
  14. I'll admit that, as a Boston sports fan, I've booed a time or two at someone who's run onto the field. We take our teams seriously, welcome them as part of the family, love and nurture them. When a player leaves the team for money, or to go play for the Yankees (which sometimes means the same thing), we take that as a personal insult. That guy is no longer welcome in our home.

    Terry Francona, Red Sox manager for several years who brought the Sox to the World Series twice, was fired after the team blew up a year ago September. Fenway Park celebrated its 100th birthday at the beginning of this season and Terry, after first declining, decided to show up for the celebration. The cheers this man got rivaled those given to few other players that day. The emotion and passion behind both cheers and boos are the same, and deeply felt.

    I use the word "We" to propose an idea. I wonder if booing and cheering are both part of a "mob" mentality. If enough voices are loud enough, others with the same feelings (and others that don't sometimes), join in and outweigh those cheering.

    I myself would have given Bieber a raspberry sound and then waited for the next quarter to begin. However, I understand the booing. If he had met O'Bama dressed similarly, a large portion of the population would boo him, and for the same reason: as a sign of disrespect. He can offer all the excuses he wants. Point is, you just don't do that.

    I don't give a break to him because of his age, either. He's opened himself up to the public, and to public opinion. and must deal with the consequences of the bad as well as the good. That's also why I don't see it as rude. It's an expression of opinion, and it's the only way that opinion can be expressed with the hope that someone actually listens to them.








    I'm not backing off this by saying "We."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please ignore that wandering sentence at the bottom of my response. It just crept in and decided to stay. (Jerk sentence.)

      Delete
    2. Shall we 'boo' the wandering sentence? :^)

      Delete
    3. Yes, that we can all do with impunity! Thanks for the giggle!

      Delete
    4. Kelly that's funny!!! Boo to the wandering sentence. As I said Dawn I sort of see it in the sports area as it is a long time tradition. Just not my particular style. I think it's nice that the returning coach got a big hand. I do have to disagree with you on what he was wearing to get his metal. The circumstances were that he was doing a show and they chose to give it to him in the middle of the show. It would be like meeting the Queen while you are still in costume back stage. Totally acceptable in my eyes. I for one was invited to the Whitehouse to meet President Bush. Colin, Brad, Seana and I spent a half hour in the Oval office and had official portraits done with the president by the White House photographer. We were, all four of us in jeans. It was all we had and it was last minute and we had no time to shop. My take on the Biebes- He was in costume and as such, just fine with me. And the truth is, he is not complaining about this, I am. He took the booing with very good grace. Thanks for your comments though. This post is getting some really interesting comments.

      Delete
    5. Yes..I just had the same discussion with a friend. Ofcourse he looked like that....If someone said I could meet Nathan Fillion...I would RUNNN without even glancing down to see if I WAS wearing anything..Well maybe a quick glance....I want him to see me...but not ALL OF ME...lol (at first atleast) ;)
      (No Karen...he's still mine)

      Delete
  15. Um...isn't he FROM Canada??? Like my sis I'm not a fan of him by any means but that's pretty ridiculous.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Totally Holly. But I'll tell you a secret about Canadians-we eat our talent! Gobble them up. We are the "we're not worthy" nation when it comes to that. If he moved to L.A. we'd be claiming him back. Sad but true!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hmmm.....Sounds like India. Ya know Canada and India are similar somehow. We use "u" in honoUr, coloUr etc. Our national sport is Hockey. We eat our talent..and claim it when it goes somewhere else and becomes successful.

    Yeah the only difference is....Cows dominate all our roads..but your roads dont have that PRIVILEGE! :P ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cows dominate our roads is the cutest sentence ever!!!

      Delete
  18. Not a Beiber fan, but I totally disagree with how he was treated. Unlike many folks, I don't even see him as particularly talented *crinkles nose*, but I have a lot of respect for how he seems to treat people and the way he reaches out to fans, especially children. Besides, I'd rather the girls in my son's class be squealing, raving, swooning fans of Justin Beiber (oh, they are!) than, for example, an "artist" whose lyrics are one verse of misogyny and violence after another. So, I'm cool with Beiber as long as I can turn the radio station when one of his songs comes on. lol I TOTALLY disapprove of what happened to him at that event. UGH! Too rude!

    But, Deb, there is one area in this where you and I disagree. You talk about shaking Ford's hand and saying a polite, "How do you do?" Well, sorry. This is actually something I've given a strangely large amount of thought over the course of the past year and a half or so as I've started to become more political. There are some people whom, no, I would not shake their hands. I would not pretend to be civil or polite. I would not acknowledge their presence. I would either a) decline the invitation to meet that person, or b) discretely step out of line when I came to that person in the midst of others. I'm a bad, bad Southern girl. I can't fake politeness in the face of that degree of intense loathing, that degree of absolute despair and rage at the hatefulness and disrespect wrought by that person. And, there are some people that I simple do NOT want to have touch me in any way, not even a handshake. I would, and I am not joking in the least here, vomit. I couldn't pretend, put on face. So, I wouldn't put myself in that situation. I wouldn't baldly disrespect the person and cause a scene. But, I wouldn't allow myself to be put in a situation where I'd have to pretend to be civil to them. Examples include public figures who have revealed themselves to be brazenly anti-Semitic (e.g. Mel Gibson), perpetrators of domestic violence (e.g. Chris Brown), rape apologists (e.g. Todd Akin and a number of other men in the recent election), those who actively denigrate women and our place in the public sphere (again, as brought out quite vividly in the recent election) (e.g. Rush Limbaugh), and verbally abusive hatemongers (e.g. Bill O'Reilly). There is also a local politician here whom I actively avoid (difficult in a small town!) because she has done so much harm.

    For example, I have a lot of respect for these bakers. Before you click on the link, let me be clear that I voted for Obama. And, while I do not agree with all of the Obama/Biden ticket positions on issues, I do support greater than 80% of the positions taken by this administration. And, while I have voted for Republican candidates in previous elections (I'm an Independent), I found the Romney/Ryan ticket this year to be completely revolting. But, you know what? I totally groove on the lady and gentleman in this story and the stand they took. I respect that they had the integrity to distance themselves from a situation that most folks would have eagerly taken as an automatic given of a yes. (Watch all the way to the end. There's a cute twist at the end. Style points to the Secret Service.)

    http://pvp.trb.com/782847669001/2012/08/782847669001_1787604590001_wdbj7-vid5388-in13973-out19615-03dc010d-502c2a4f.mp4?pubId=782847669001&videoId=1787545009001


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good points all Rigel. I would urge you to watch the doc on Biebs. He still may not be your cup of tea but he has certainly got talent. Loads of it in fact. Has been playing 5 instruments well since he was a toddler, writes, sings, dances. As far as the shaking hands, I would NOT go out of my way to shake the hands of those I don't respect but sometimes (like meeting Mr. Bush) we are in a position where the only way to avoid it is to shake or refuse. I would never ever do that.

      Delete
  19. I can't stand the rude behaviour of hearing boos. I always think what if that was my child.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Like many of you here, I'm not a Bieber fan. But it's like Deb said, we're not the target demographic for that particular singer. Still, I do believe the booing was unnecessary.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Ok so this post hae been about other people putting people down with boos. So here is a video of people helping another overcome and thrive! But this video is amazing! I had to share it with you guys. Not sure if a comment is the best place but I figured it would work. Feel free to take down or save for later or what all Deb and Barbara.
    And just for comparison it took me three weeks to get where this guy is in 20 minutes! I know I'm clumsy but I've got two hands! All the more inspiring.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODTv0TL9DLk

    ReplyDelete
  22. This is completely off-topic, but why, oh why, must I always feel like crap when I have a ton of work to do? It happens every time I get sick - if work is slow, I feel alright and could do with being a bit busier. But if I have a million things to do, then I just can't seem to find the energy to get it done. *sigh* I just can't win...

    ReplyDelete
  23. Souzan Rezai from Vancouver, BCNovember 30, 2012 at 6:29 PM

    Wonderful post, and amazing comments. I, like many here, am not a fan of Justin Bieber as a singer because like you said Deb, basically no one on this blog is his target demographic...But I, too, hate the booing. I find it disgusting and sad. My favourite sport experience was seeing a hockey game between Sweden and Norway during the winter Olympics in Vancouver. Because the stadium was filled by locals who mainly weren't biased one way or another between either team, no matter what happened everyone cheered. Someone scored-- mad cheering. Someone saved against a goal-- mad cheering. Granted I realize that it was because no one really had a vested interest in who won or lost, and having been to other games where I DID have a vested interested, I understand the need t cheer for your team, and be upset when they lose.
    But man, for that one night, the sporting industry was everything Elementary School tried to pretend it could be.

    I will say that I am surprised that the coordinator in charge who hired Bieber for the event hadn't seen the high possibility that the Grey Cup would be a horrible venue to have Justin Bieber headline for...If Bob Dylan opened for a Tinkerbell and Friends concert type thing, I wouldn't be completely shocked if he got booed at as well. It doesn't make it okay by any means! I'm just saying, I wouldn't be shocked...

    ReplyDelete

We love it when you share your own stories and experiences! Welcome.